Scienzaonline - Ultimi Articoli

Fecondazione assistita: metodo Cnr per identificare gli ovociti più sani   

Fecondazione assistita: metodo Cnr per identificare gli ovociti più sani  

31 Luglio 2019

Immagine allegata: Sequenza di passaggi a cui è soggetto normalmente...

Immunità e tumori:  scoperta una molecola che previene la formazione delle metastasi

Immunità e tumori: scoperta una molecola che previene la formazione delle metastasi

30 Luglio 2019

È italiana la scoperta della molecola MS4A4A che, grazie al...

Aggiungi un fiore a tavola (da mangiare)

Aggiungi un fiore a tavola (da mangiare)

30 Luglio 2019

L’Università di Pisa partner del progetto Antea per sostenere la...

Giornata mondiale della tigre

Giornata mondiale della tigre

29 Luglio 2019

Oggi restano appena 3890 individui in 13 paesi In Nepal,...

Il più antico calendario lunare in un ciottolo di 10.000 anni fa dei Castelli Romani

Il più antico calendario lunare in un ciottolo di 10.000 anni fa dei Castelli Romani

29 Luglio 2019

Un nuovo studio, coordinato dalla Sapienza, scopre il più antico...

Le piante a foglie rosse sono più resistenti agli stress rispetto a quelle a foglie verdi

Le piante a foglie rosse sono più resistenti agli stress rispetto a quelle a foglie verdi

22 Luglio 2019

La scoperta, utile per la progettazione del verde nelle nostre...

La resilienza dell’orzo: è l’unica pianta in grado di crescere in tutte le aree agricole del mondo

La resilienza dell’orzo: è l’unica pianta in grado di crescere in tutte le aree agricole del mondo

12 Luglio 2019

L’Università Statale di Milano assieme al CREA e al PTP...

BAMBINO GESU’: TUTTO SULLA SALUTE DEI DENTI, DALL’IGIENE ORALE ALL’APPARECCHIO

BAMBINO GESU’: TUTTO SULLA SALUTE DEI DENTI, DALL’IGIENE ORALE ALL’APPARECCHIO

12 Luglio 2019

Convincere un bambino a lavarsi i denti può rivelarsi un’impresa...

Articoli filtrati per data: Sabato, 25 Febbraio 2017

Xylella fastidiosa in olive tree

Expert ecologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) have devised a scientific model which could help predict the spread of the deadly Xylella fastidiosa which is threatening to destroy Europe’s olive trees. The CEH scientists have created a model which is able to qualitatively and quantitatively predict how the deadly bacterial pathogen may spread as well as offer guidance on how buffer zones should be arranged to protect uninfected olive trees. The research, published in the journal Biological Invasions, highlights how Xylella fastidiosa is influenced by a range of insects – including spittlebugs – and the rate to which these vectors contribute to the potential spread of the disease across Europe and beyond.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Sabato, 25 Febbraio 2017 14:13

Cooperation with Namibia underway

 

From left: Professor Gerhard Wenz, Saarland University, Bernd Reinhard, INM, Günter Weber, Business Director, INM, Erold Naomab, University of Namibia, Professor Kenneth Matengu, Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Namibia, Professor Aránzazu del Campo, Scientific Director, INM, Roland Rolles, Vice President, Saarland University, Carsten Becker-Willinger, Head of Project NaMiComp, INM.

 

The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials officially began its collaborative effort with the University of Namibia (UNAM) by holding a kick-off workshop. The aim of the joint project, NaMiComp, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is to analyze Namibia’s locally available natural resources and then use them as a basis for new materials for industrial applications. INM and UNAM are working together on the NaMiComp project in order to establish and strengthen research competence in materials science at UNAM. In the long term, the aim is to build an on-site materials science institute at the University of Namibia. The two-day long workshop, which was held at the INM, was the inaugural event for building this cooperation. Further multi-day workshops, reciprocal visits by experts, field surveys and learning cafés are set to follow.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

Mosaic pneumococcal population structure caused by horizontal gene transfer is shown on the left for a subset of genes. Matrix on the right shows a genome-wide summary of the relationships between the bacteria, ranging from blue (distant) to yellow (closely related). Photo: Pekka Marttinen

 

Gene transfers are particularly common in the antibiotic-resistance genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria.

When mammals breed, the genome of the offspring is a combination of the parents' genomes. Bacteria, by contrast, reproduce through cell division. In theory, this means that the genomes of the offspring are copies of the parent genome. However, the process is not quite as straightforward as this due to horizontal gene transfer through which bacteria can transfer fragments of their genome to each other. As a result of this phenomenon, the genome of an individual bacterium can be a combination of genes from several different donors. Some of the genome fragments may even originate from completely different species.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

 

Scienzaonline con sottotitolo Sciencenew  - Periodico
Autorizzazioni del Tribunale di Roma – diffusioni:
telematica quotidiana 229/2006 del 08/06/2006
mensile per mezzo stampa 293/2003 del 07/07/2003
Scienceonline, Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma 228/2006 del 29/05/06
Pubblicato a Roma – Via A. De Viti de Marco, 50 – Direttore Responsabile Guido Donati

Photo Gallery