Ultimi Articoli

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA
29 Maggio 2020

I risultati di un progetto pilota finanziato da AriSLA (Fondazione...

Planting trees on coffee fields and plantations can protect coffee plants from climate change
29 Maggio 2020

Will we still drink coffee in the future, and will...

Rischio genetico del melanoma: la ricerca pubblicata su Nature Genetics
29 Maggio 2020

Una collaborazione internazionale tra 115 istituzioni in tutto il mondo,...

‘Near-unlivable’ heat for one-third of humans within 50 years if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut
29 Maggio 2020

Areas of the planet home to one-third of humans will...

A genomic analysis in samples of Neanderthals and modern humans shows a decrease in ADHD-associated genetic variants
29 Maggio 2020

The experts Paula Esteller, Bru Cormand and Òscar Lao. The...

Condizioni abitative e disagio psico-fisico nel periodo di lockdown
29 Maggio 2020

Che impatto ha la casa in cui viviamo sulla nostra...

Coronavirus: the importance of ventilation
29 Maggio 2020

Droplets produced by coughing, photographed using laser techniques. The large...

Same father, same face
29 Maggio 2020

More like mom or dad? Human babies always get this...

Lunedì, 11 Settembre 2017
Lunedì, 11 Settembre 2017 17:01

Transforming Wood into Food

 

At the moment, some sawmills treat sawdust as special waste, because it can’t be put to good use. Growing sawdust piles can even limit production. Risto Korpinen from Luke thinks that sawdust could be a part of the answer to the world’s need for food. In 2050, there will be approximately two billion more people in need of food than today. Scarcity of nutrition will become increasingly common as the amount of arable land will decrease by 600 square metres per person. At the same time, Finnish sawmills are producing 3.3 million cubic metres of sawdust each year. Even though a large part of it is used for pulp and energy production, a substantial amount of it is piling up, unused and finally rotten. World hunger and sawdust waste may seem like two separate issues, but Luke’s Research Scientist Risto Korpinen thinks they can be combined. Korpinen is leading a project called MonoCell – High-quality single cell protein for fish feed. The project’s title alone reveals quite a lot about its aim: to make high quality single-cell protein out of sawdust. The protein could later on be developed into fish feed.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Lunedì, 11 Settembre 2017 16:58

Overcoming borders to crowdfund green energy

 A French solar park, used by local farmers, has been successfully co-financed by investors from France and the Netherlands, thanks to an innovative solution tested by two renewable crowdfunding platforms. They managed to overcome regulatory barriers between EU countries . Solar parks proliferate in Europe and boost development of renewables, but the issue of land use is often raised. A new trend is to produce energy and cultivate crops at the same time, in other words use agrivoltaic systems. One example is the Torreilles solar park, in the South West of France. The plant’s total power capacity is 9.6MW and stretches for 43 hectares along the so-called “Route du soleil”, near Perpignan. It can produce 14,000,000 kWh per year, enough to supply 5,200 families or allow 1,400 electric cars to travel around the world, saving 1,100 tons of CO2.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

A Scientist at the University of Birmingham has received a £1.4 million award from Cancer Research UK to carry out pioneering research that may discover how cancer ‘steals the keys’ from the body’s locksmiths, disrupting healthy cell growth and function. Dr Mathew Coleman, of the Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences at the University of Birmingham, is set to receive £1.4m over six years from Cancer Research UK to find out more about three specific proteins that are thought to have a role in cancer. Although this research focuses on gastrointestinal cancer, their findings will likely be applicable to a variety of other tumour types. The proteins in our body come in all shapes and sizes and play a range of roles, including controlling energy production, cell growth and cell function. But if these proteins become faulty, it can affect how they work, causing them – and cells – to go out of control.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

Medicina

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA

29 Maggio 2020

I risultati di un progetto pilota finanziato da AriSLA (Fondazione...

Paleontologia

Quando gli elefanti popolavano il Nord Europa

Quando gli elefanti popolavano il Nord Europa

25 Maggio 2020

Il Dipartimento di Scienze dell’antichità della Sapienza ha partecipato al ritrovamento di uno scheletro...

Geografia e Storia

EcoSismaBonus e Geotermia nel Decreto Rilancio: geologi soddisfatti, ora necessaria normativa nazionale

EcoSismaBonus e Geotermia nel Decreto Rilancio: geologi soddisfatti, ora necessaria normativa nazionale

27 Maggio 2020

"Esprimiamo soddisfazione per le previsioni nel Decreto Rilancio delle nuove misure per l'EcoSismaBonus e,...

Astronomia e Spazio

Fotografato il getto relativistico prodotto dalla sorgente GW170817

Fotografato il getto relativistico prodotto dalla sorgente GW170817

22 Febbraio 2019

Un team internazionale di ricercatori ha analizzato dati provenienti da 33...

Scienze Naturali e Ambiente

WWF: "Bene la chiusura del carbone a Brindisi"

WWF: "Bene la chiusura del carbone a Brindisi"

29 Maggio 2020

Nel 2021 chiuderà il Gruppo 2 a carbone della Centrale Federico...

 

Scienzaonline con sottotitolo Sciencenew  - Periodico
Autorizzazioni del Tribunale di Roma – diffusioni:
telematica quotidiana 229/2006 del 08/06/2006
mensile per mezzo stampa 293/2003 del 07/07/2003
Scienceonline, Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma 228/2006 del 29/05/06
Pubblicato a Roma – Via A. De Viti de Marco, 50 – Direttore Responsabile Guido Donati

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