Ultimi Articoli

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA
29 Maggio 2020

I risultati di un progetto pilota finanziato da AriSLA (Fondazione...

Planting trees on coffee fields and plantations can protect coffee plants from climate change
29 Maggio 2020

Will we still drink coffee in the future, and will...

Rischio genetico del melanoma: la ricerca pubblicata su Nature Genetics
29 Maggio 2020

Una collaborazione internazionale tra 115 istituzioni in tutto il mondo,...

‘Near-unlivable’ heat for one-third of humans within 50 years if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut
29 Maggio 2020

Areas of the planet home to one-third of humans will...

A genomic analysis in samples of Neanderthals and modern humans shows a decrease in ADHD-associated genetic variants
29 Maggio 2020

The experts Paula Esteller, Bru Cormand and Òscar Lao. The...

Condizioni abitative e disagio psico-fisico nel periodo di lockdown
29 Maggio 2020

Che impatto ha la casa in cui viviamo sulla nostra...

Coronavirus: the importance of ventilation
29 Maggio 2020

Droplets produced by coughing, photographed using laser techniques. The large...

Same father, same face
29 Maggio 2020

More like mom or dad? Human babies always get this...

Sabato, 30 Settembre 2017
Sabato, 30 Settembre 2017 16:45

New study changes our view on flying insects

 Manduca sexta (Photo: Anders Hedenström)

For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. At this speed, they are the most efficient and consume the least amount of energy. Corresponding phenomena have previously been demonstrated in birds, but never among insects. Previous studies of bumblebees have shown that they consume as much energy in forward flight as when they hover, i.e. remain still in the air. New findings from Lund University in Sweden show that this does not apply to all insects. Biologist Kajsa Warfvinge, together with her colleagues at Lund University, has studied the large moths known as tobacco hawkmoths or Manduca sexta. The results show that these moths, like birds, consume different amounts of energy depending on their flight speed. Flying really slowly or really fast requires the most effort. The discovery may help other researchers who study how insects migrate from one environment to another.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

 

 

Modern neuroscience has long been smitten by the idea of identifying how the brain and its complex array of nerve cells bring about social behaviour.

There are several levels of social behaviour but perhaps the most primitive are those that make parents act to ensure the well-being of their off spring. Indeed maternal instincts (sorry Dads) are recognised as among the most potent of behavioural drives. Now, researchers at the University of Southampton together with colleagues at the National Infection Service, Porton Down and KU Leuven in Belgium, have recognised that the simple worm - C.elegans (approximately 1mm in length) - may actually harbour an ancient form of parental behaviour designed to benefit their offspring. Professor Vincent O’Connor, who jointly led the work with Lindy Holden-Dye and Mathew Wand, described how the colleagues reached their conclusions about the ‘caring’ behaviour exhibited by the worms. “The worms lead a simple life in which they feed off the bacteria that exist in the fermenting environments they live in,” explains Professor O’Connor. “They perpetuate generations using a life cycle in which adult worms self-fertilize and lay their off spring into the bacteria. This immediately sets up a conundrum, as the parent will be competing for the same food source as their off spring.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

Medicina

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA

Il recettore GPR17 come potenziale bersaglio farmacologico per il trattamento della SLA

29 Maggio 2020

I risultati di un progetto pilota finanziato da AriSLA (Fondazione...

Paleontologia

Quando gli elefanti popolavano il Nord Europa

Quando gli elefanti popolavano il Nord Europa

25 Maggio 2020

Il Dipartimento di Scienze dell’antichità della Sapienza ha partecipato al ritrovamento di uno scheletro...

Geografia e Storia

EcoSismaBonus e Geotermia nel Decreto Rilancio: geologi soddisfatti, ora necessaria normativa nazionale

EcoSismaBonus e Geotermia nel Decreto Rilancio: geologi soddisfatti, ora necessaria normativa nazionale

27 Maggio 2020

"Esprimiamo soddisfazione per le previsioni nel Decreto Rilancio delle nuove misure per l'EcoSismaBonus e,...

Astronomia e Spazio

Fotografato il getto relativistico prodotto dalla sorgente GW170817

Fotografato il getto relativistico prodotto dalla sorgente GW170817

22 Febbraio 2019

Un team internazionale di ricercatori ha analizzato dati provenienti da 33...

Scienze Naturali e Ambiente

WWF: "Bene la chiusura del carbone a Brindisi"

WWF: "Bene la chiusura del carbone a Brindisi"

29 Maggio 2020

Nel 2021 chiuderà il Gruppo 2 a carbone della Centrale Federico...

 

Scienzaonline con sottotitolo Sciencenew  - Periodico
Autorizzazioni del Tribunale di Roma – diffusioni:
telematica quotidiana 229/2006 del 08/06/2006
mensile per mezzo stampa 293/2003 del 07/07/2003
Scienceonline, Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma 228/2006 del 29/05/06
Pubblicato a Roma – Via A. De Viti de Marco, 50 – Direttore Responsabile Guido Donati

Photo Gallery