Scienceonline - Last News

Winners of the 2019 UN Global Climate Action Awards Announced

Winners of the 2019 UN Global Climate Action Awards Announced

27 Settembre 2019

The recipients of the 2019 United Nations Global Climate Action...

Building up an appetite for a new kind of grub

Building up an appetite for a new kind of grub

01 Luglio 2019

Food preparation using cricket garnish and ground cricket Credit: Guiomar...

How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use

How genes affect tobacco and alcohol use

22 Febbraio 2019

Data from 1.2 million people reveal how tobacco and alcohol...

Human cells can change job to fight diabetes

Human cells can change job to fight diabetes

15 Febbraio 2019

For the first time, researchers have shown that ordinary human...

New study shows how vegans, vegetarians and omnivores feel about eating insects

New study shows how vegans, vegetarians and omnivores feel about eating insects

01 Febbraio 2019

Many non-vegan vegetarians and omnivores are open to including insects...

Stress and dream sleep are linked to pathways of brain cell death and survival

Stress and dream sleep are linked to pathways of brain cell death and survival

28 Gennaio 2019

The first and most distinct consequence of daily mild stress...

Treat vitamin D deficiency to prevent deadly lung attacks

Treat vitamin D deficiency to prevent deadly lung attacks

11 Gennaio 2019

Vitamin D supplements have been found to reduce the risk...

Articoli filtrati per data: Lunedì, 23 Aprile 2018

 The link between higher consumption of fish and better long-term health for the brain has been long established. Now, new research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that the protein parvalbumin may be a contributing factor. 
Johan Bodell, Chalmers University of Technology (45)
 

A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health. Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Fish has long been considered a healthy food, linked to improved long-term cognitive health, but the reasons for this have been unclear. Omega-3 and -6, fatty acids commonly found in fish, are often assumed to be responsible, and are commonly marketed in this fashion. However, the scientific research regarding this topic has drawn mixed conclusions. Now, new research from Chalmers has shown that the protein parvalbumin, which is very common in many fish species, may be contributing to this effect.

One of the hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease is amyloid formation of a particular human protein, called alpha-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein is even sometimes referred to as the ‘Parkinson’s protein’What the Chalmers researchers have now discovered, is that parvalbumin can form amyloid structures that bind together with the alpha-synuclein protein. Parvalbumin effectively ‘scavenges’ the alpha-synuclein proteins, using them for its own purposes, thus preventing them from forming their own potentially harmful amyloids later on.

“Parvalbumin collects up the ‘Parkinson’s protein’ and actually prevents it from aggregating, simply by aggregating itself first,” explains Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, Professor and Head of the Chemical Biology division at Chalmers, and lead author on the study. With the parvalbumin protein so highly abundant in certain fish species, increasing the amount of fish in our diet might be a simple way to fight off Parkinson’s disease. Herring, cod, carp, and redfish, including sockeye salmon and red snapper, have particularly high levels of parvalbumin, but it is common in many other fish species too. The levels of parvalbumin can also vary greatly throughout the year.

“Fish is normally a lot more nutritious at the end of the summer, because of increased metabolic activity. Levels of parvalbumin are much higher in fish after they have had a lot of sun, so it could be worthwhile increasing consumption during autumn,” says Nathalie Scheers, Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, and researcher on the study. It was Nathalie who first had the inspiration to investigate parvalbumin more closely, after a previous study she did looking at biomarkers for fish consumption.

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
 
 
Una ricerca iniziata solo pochi anni fa, quindi, e' diventata un punto di riferimento mondiale per i centri di fecondazione. La scoperta, tutta italiana, fa sapere che le cellule malate degli embrioni sanno correggere da soli i propri errori e dar vita a bambini sani, a patto pero' che siano geneticamente sani ha avuto grande eco sul 'New England Journal of Medicine', soprattutto perche' ha portato alla nascita di otto bambini sani sani su venti trasferimenti. Era il 2014 e da allora sono stati fatti nascere centinaia di bambini, che fino a poco tempo fa sarebbero stati solo embrioni congelati e soprattutto considerati inadatti e quindi abbandonati.

"Non sono gli embrioni morfologicamente normali che s'impiantano nell'utero materno, come una volta si riteneva spiega il professor Ermanno Greco, direttore scientifico del Centro di Medicina della Riproduzione dell'European Hospital di Roma che, in collaborazione con il Genoma Group Molecular Genetics Laboratories, ha pubblicato lo studio sul 'New England Journal of Medicine' e ora su 'Fertility and Sterility'- ma quelli geneticamente sani. Significa che tramite la diagnosi genetica preimpianto e' possibile capire quali siano gli embrioni con un corredo cromosomico corretto e, se anche ci sono alterazioni morfologiche, sanno comunque risolverli da soli".
Pubblicato in Medicina

 

Scienzaonline con sottotitolo Sciencenew  - Periodico
Autorizzazioni del Tribunale di Roma – diffusioni:
telematica quotidiana 229/2006 del 08/06/2006
mensile per mezzo stampa 293/2003 del 07/07/2003
Scienceonline, Autorizzazione del Tribunale di Roma 228/2006 del 29/05/06
Pubblicato a Roma – Via A. De Viti de Marco, 50 – Direttore Responsabile Guido Donati

Photo Gallery