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Aterosclerosi, scoperta la molecola in grado di frenare la malattia

Aterosclerosi, scoperta la molecola in grado di frenare la malattia

27 Novembre 2019

Individuati possibili futuri farmaci in grado di bloccare lo sviluppo...

La grave crisi dei Koala

La grave crisi dei Koala

27 Novembre 2019

Se non verranno fermati la distruzione delle foreste e il...

Una lente per cellulare più potente di un microscopio

Una lente per cellulare più potente di un microscopio

27 Novembre 2019

È stata progettata nei laboratori del Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione...

Gli echi sensoriali del passato condizionano il nostro modo di udire le cose

Gli echi sensoriali del passato condizionano il nostro modo di udire le cose

22 Novembre 2019

Lo dimostra uno studio risultato di una collaborazione internazionale tra...

Da oggi è possibile bio-stampare anche i neuroni

Da oggi è possibile bio-stampare anche i neuroni

22 Novembre 2019

Lo studio, pubblicato sulla rivista internazionale Journal of Clinical Medicine,...

La terra brucia, roccia più calda e meno stabile

La terra brucia, roccia più calda e meno stabile

18 Novembre 2019

È stato misurato l’attimo esatto in cui scompare il permafrost...

Scoperta una nuova specie di lucertola. Da due milioni di anni vive indisturbata nelle isole pontine

Scoperta una nuova specie di lucertola. Da due milioni di anni vive indisturbata nelle isole pontine

18 Novembre 2019

A individuare il rettile un gruppo di ricerca guidato dal...

Articoli filtrati per data: Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013

News tips:

please read this interesting article posted by Lawrence LeBlond on redOrbit.com


New Species Of Big Cat Discovered In Tibet Fills Evolutionary Gap


The evolution of big cats has been nearly as mysterious as the cats themselves, but a new discovery will likely lead anthropologists to a better understanding of when and where big cats originated.

During a 2010 paleontological dig in Tibet, a husband-and-wife team who were part of a larger expedition discovered the fossilized partial remains of what appeared to be a type of cat. University of Southern California (USC) graduate Z. Jack Tseng and his wife Juan Liu made the discovery in the Zanda Basin near the border of Pakistan and China.

Tseng, who now works with the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York, said the discovery was a surprise. In a Smithsonian Magazine blog, Tseng explained that the team had been driving trail after trail in the Tibetan “badlands” before discovering a patch of fossils protruding from the ground on one particular hillside.

“In the little concentration of fossils, there were lots of limb bones from antelopes and horses obscuring everything else,” said Tseng. “It wasn’t until we started lifting things up, one by one, that we saw the top of a skull, and we thought, from the shape, that it looked something like a cat.”

http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113001694/big-cat-fossil-tibet-evolution-farther-back-111313/

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013 20:41

Sea jellyfish threat in Australia

Sea jelly threat in AU. Warming waters and changing currents could bring a particularly dangerous species southward along Queensland coast.

Under changing ocean conditions, could more dangerous jellyfish be moving farther south?

Will venomous irukandji jellyfish reach south-east Queensland?

For the people of northern Australia, dangerous jellyfish stings are all too common. But under changing ocean conditions, could more of these dangerous jellyfish be moving farther south along the Queensland coast?

Increasing ocean temperatures and strengthening ocean currents are causing many marine species to migrate polewards. Among the species predicted to expand their distribution is the potentially deadly irukandji jellyfish, which are found in tropical regions around the world, including northern Queensland.

If these jellyfish do reach south-east Queensland waters, it could have a severe impact on local tourism and human health in coming generations.

Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/will-venomous-irukandji-jellyfish-reach-southeast-queensland-20131029-2wd1x.html#ixzz2kYY2w09k

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013 20:33

Tyrannosauridae: really interesting news

News tips:

please read thisinteresting article posted by  Mark A. Loewen, Randall B. Irmis, Joseph J. W. Sertich, Philip J. Currie, Scott D. Sampson on Plosone

Tyrant Dinosaur Evolution Tracks the Rise and Fall of Late Cretaceous Oceans


The Late Cretaceous (~95–66 million years ago) western North American landmass of Laramidia displayed heightened non-marine vertebrate diversity and intracontinental regionalism relative to other latest Cretaceous Laurasian ecosystems. Processes generating these patterns during this interval remain poorly understood despite their presumed role in the diversification of many clades. Tyrannosauridae, a clade of large-bodied theropod dinosaurs restricted to the Late Cretaceous of Laramidia and Asia, represents an ideal group for investigating Laramidian patterns of evolution. We use new tyrannosaurid discoveries from Utah—including a new taxon which represents the geologically oldest member of the clade—to investigate the evolution and biogeography of Tyrannosauridae. These data suggest a Laramidian origin for Tyrannosauridae, and implicate sea-level related controls in the isolation, diversification, and dispersal of this and many other Late Cretaceous vertebrate clades.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0079420

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013 20:32

Tyrannosauridae: really interesting news

News tips:

please read thisinteresting article posted by  Mark A. Loewen, Randall B. Irmis, Joseph J. W. Sertich, Philip J. Currie, Scott D. Sampson on Plosone

Tyrant Dinosaur Evolution Tracks the Rise and Fall of Late Cretaceous Oceans


The Late Cretaceous (~95–66 million years ago) western North American landmass of Laramidia displayed heightened non-marine vertebrate diversity and intracontinental regionalism relative to other latest Cretaceous Laurasian ecosystems. Processes generating these patterns during this interval remain poorly understood despite their presumed role in the diversification of many clades. Tyrannosauridae, a clade of large-bodied theropod dinosaurs restricted to the Late Cretaceous of Laramidia and Asia, represents an ideal group for investigating Laramidian patterns of evolution. We use new tyrannosaurid discoveries from Utah—including a new taxon which represents the geologically oldest member of the clade—to investigate the evolution and biogeography of Tyrannosauridae. These data suggest a Laramidian origin for Tyrannosauridae, and implicate sea-level related controls in the isolation, diversification, and dispersal of this and many other Late Cretaceous vertebrate clades.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0079420

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

News tips:

please read this interesting article by Aditya Joshi, Srinivas Vaidyanathan, Samrat Mondol, Advait Edgaonkar, Uma Ramakrishnan on Plosone

Connectivity of Tiger (Panthera tigris) Populations in the Human-Influenced Forest Mosaic of Central India

Today, most wild tigers live in small, isolated Protected Areas within human dominated landscapes in the Indian subcontinent. Future survival of tigers depends on increasing local population size, as well as maintaining connectivity between populations. While significant conservation effort has been invested in increasing tiger population size, few initiatives have focused on landscape-level connectivity and on understanding the effect different landscape elements have on maintaining connectivity.
We combined individual-based genetic and landscape ecology approaches to address this issue in six protected areas with varying tiger densities and separation in the Central Indian tiger landscape. We non-invasively sampled 55 tigers from different protected areas within this landscape. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian genetic assignment tests indicate long-range tiger dispersal (on the order of 650 km) between protected areas.

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0077980

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

Japanese and New Zealand scientists discover more marine critters at 1200+ feet deep off NZ using the Skinkai submersible. (video)
Scientists have discovered rare marine creatures living hundreds of metres below the ocean surface.

Scientists discover rare new marine creatures

By Tony Field

Japanese and New Zealand scientists have discovered rare marine creatures living hundreds of metres below the ocean surface.

The research vessel Yokosuka has docked in Auckland, after exploring underwater mountains and volcanoes, about 1000 kilometres northeast of New Zealand.

Images recorded by the scientists show creatures they encountered 400 to 500 metres beneath the surface, some in areas containing active marine volcanoes along the Kermadec Trench.



http://www.3news.co.nz/Scientists-discover-rare-new-marine-creatures/tabid/1160/articleID/319926/Default.aspx#!

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013 19:56

Jellyfish news

More jellyfish blooms? The jury is still out but one researcher writes that it's possible due to loss of predators, pollutants, and global warming.

Are Ocean Conditions Ripe for a Jellyfish Takeover?

By Elizabeth Howell on Livescience.com

Data on jellyfish populations is making it hard to figure out if they are on the rise, and – if that rise is indeed happening – why it is so.

In 2000, a bloom of sea tomato jellyfish in Australia was so enormous — it stretched for more than 1,000 miles from north to south — that it was even visible from space. It was certainly a bloom that Australian jellyfish researcher Lisa-ann Gershwin won't forget.

 

http://www.livescience.com/40951-oceans-ripe-for-jellyfish-takover.html#!

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
Mercoledì, 13 Novembre 2013 19:39

Ocean Acidification Database

News tips:

please read this interesting article on co2science.org

Ocean Acidification Database

Our Ocean Acidification Database consists of an ever-expanding archive on the response of marine organisms to ocean acidification as reported in the peer-reviewed scientific literature.  Results are tabulated by response, including calcification, fertility, growth, metabolism and survival. To begin, click on one of the links below.

http://www.co2science.org/data/acidification/acidification.php

 

Pubblicato in Scienceonline


Scaring away sharks in AU using recorded sounds of orcas - a theory to be tested but there's concern that it could chase away other animals, upsetting the marine balance.

'Screams' could chase away other marine life
by: Mitchell Nadin
From: The Australian
November 05, 2013 12:00AM

RECORDINGS of killer whale "screams" intended to scare sharks from popular West Australian beaches could end up chasing away other marine life, including dolphins.

 

 

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/health-science/screams-could-chase-away-other-marine-life/story-e6frg8y6-1226753085502#!

Pubblicato in Scienceonline

News tips:

please read this interesting article by Asma Mostafa, Laila Anjuman Banu, Fashiur Rahman and Sudip Paul on Journal of Anthropology

Craniofacial Anthropometric Profile of Adult Bangladeshi Buddhist Chakma Females

The present descriptive, observational, and cross-sectional study was designed to establish the baseline measurements of the craniofacial anthropometrical parameters and indices of 100 adult Bangladeshi Buddhist Chakma females aged between 25 and 45 years, residing at different locations of Chittagong and Rangamati cities. A total of ten craniofacial variables were measured using physical and photographic procedures. Craniofacial indices were calculated from those craniofacial variables. The craniofacial indices showed that Chakma females are mostly hyperbrachycephalic, hypereuryprosopic, and mesorrhine, with intermediate eyes and long narrow ears.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/janthro/2013/676924/

Pubblicato in Scienceonline
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